Recent Posts:

Archive for Christianity

Sep
23

The Great and (Un)Holy War

Posted by: | Comments (0)

jenkins_great_and_holy_warOne would think that if there is any group of people that would be opposed to war it would be Christians. After all, they claim to worship the Prince of Peace. But such is not the case now, and such was not the case 100 years ago during the Great War that we now call World War I.

I have often pointed out how strange it is that Christians should be so accepting of war. War is the greatest suppressor of civil liberties. War is the greatest creator of widows and orphans. War is the greatest destroyer of religion, morality, and decency. War is the greatest creator of fertile ground for genocides and atrocities. War is the greatest destroyer of families and young lives. War is the greatest creator of famine, disease, and homelessness. War is the health of the state.

Just as it was easy for the state to enlist the support of Christians for the Cold and Vietnam Wars against “godless communism,” so it is easy now for the state to garner Christian support for the War on Terror against “Islamic extremists.” But World War I was a Christian slaughterhouse. It was Christian vs. Christian, Protestant vs. Protestant, Catholic vs. Catholic. And to a lesser extent, it was also Jew vs. Jew and Muslim vs. Muslim.

Read More→

Categories : Articles
Comments (0)

The Christians for Liberty 2014 Conference has come and gone, but now we get to post the videos from the conference for everyone to see.

Rep. David Simpson (R-Longview) gave the evening keynote of the conference. For our readers who have never heard of him, I like to call David “the Ron Paul of the Texas legislature” for the heroic stands he has taken in the defense of personal liberty, such as our fight against the TSA and against corruption. David is also an entrepreneur and a life-long Christian – and there’s nothing phony about him.

In this talk, David discusses the implications of being a liberty-minded Christian in today’s political climate. He additionally explains his reasoning for his recent stand against mistreatment of immigrants fleeing the terrible circumstances of their countries of origin. It was an honor to have him participate in the conference!

I hope you agree that David is one-of-a-kind. Share this with your friends and family, especially if they are in Texas!

Categories : Articles, Media
Comments (0)

Three weeks ago, we hosted the first ever Christians for Liberty Conference at St. Edwards University in Austin, Texas. Now that we have had a chance to breathe a little bit, I want to give you a brief report on what happened.

On Friday night, August 1st, we hosted a panel discussion and ice cream social at the University Avenue Church of Christ. (UA Church is the congregation where I attend and am a part-time minister.) The panel consisted of Lauren Daugherty, Patrick Dixon, Jason Rink, and myself. We discussed how our Christian faith informs our libertarian activities in the local community, and we took questions for about 40 minutes from the attendees on a variety of topics, from dealing with social issues to left-libertarianism!

Saturday was our main event. Although never explicitly stated, the schedule for the day was divided into three “sessions.” The morning session had a “fundamentals” focus, and included talks such as my Biblical Foundations of Christian Libertarianism and Jason Rink’s American Idol presentation.

After lunch, we had our first keynote talk from David Theroux, President of the Independent Institute, about C.S. Lewis and “mere liberty”. Then, the first afternoon session dealt with targeted issues about liberty and Christian faith, such as the drug war and poverty.

The final series of talks focused on practical issues. You might say these were of a more “activist” nature, and included LCC author Doug Stuart’s presentation Stuck in the Middle. It culminated with Rep. David Simpson discussing the practical implications of being a liberty-minded Christian. After an incredible barbeque dinner, we heard from Students For Liberty president Alexander McCobin about why he believes it is so important for Christians to understand libertarianism. We then had a splendid social time afterward for those who wanted to stay late and keep the discussion going.

On Sunday, we convened again at the University Avenue Church of Christ in the afternoon for an open discussion on whatever was on our minds after such a great Saturday conference. We even discussed the upcoming plans to start a regular meetup in Austin for Christian libertarians and encouraged visiting from out of town to prayerfully consider starting their own as well.

All in all, it was an absolutely incredible weekend and rivals some of the best experiences of my life. Conferences are big commitments for both organizers and attendees, but a well-put together event has a huge payoff. I think all attendees would agree that this first-ever conference was just what we needed to take our movement to the next level. Now, we look forward to putting together the CFL Leadership Team and continuing to build the Christian libertarian movement. Click here for more information about the CFL Leadership Team.

Here are some of the photos taken from the conference that we have posted to our Facebook page. Please “like” LCC on Facebook as well!

On behalf of all the organizers, I want to say THANK YOU to all our attendees and our sponsors. We couldn’t have done it without you! I especially want to thank my wife Katelyn for all of her support and for organizing all the food for Saturday. Special thanks as well to my brother Dustin for stepping up and helping the whole way through, Doug Stuart for being our Emcee, Jason Rink for video support, and Andy Fernandez for managing so much of the facility reservations and all of the sound on the day-of.

We will continue to post videos from the conference (minus the Q&A) to LibertarianChristians.com for all to see, and I hope you will avail yourself of these great resources.

Categories : Articles, Blog News
Comments (0)

This article was jointly written by Doug Stuart and Jessica Hooker.

In Stoker’s original article, she outlined three objections to the compatibility of Christianity and libertarianism, with subsequent expansions in later posts. Our previous posts addressed her first two points, and this article addresses her third point. Read our first post here, and our second post here. A substantial amount of time has passed since the aforementioned posts were originally written, so we encourage you to review them for additional context.

The first biblical story about humans is about human action and consequences. Whether one takes the story of Adam and Eve as historical-factual or non-literal, the narrative in Scripture functions as more than a mere explanation of why sin exists or where humans come from. This origin story frames the questions about divine-human relationship: “How shall we relate to God?” and “What are God’s expectations?” (among others). Far from playing the part of Divine Puppeteer,  God bestowed Adam and Eve with the dignity of choice.  God had spent six days creating the good world in which God placed God’s crowning creation—mankind—and from our perspective God would have been justified in thwarting any attempt to mar that world.  If God was willing to give them such a level of freedom that could—and ultimately did—result in cursing a perfect world, how much more freedom are we then given in the small things? We may even wonder why God placed a tree in the garden whose fruit could bring such sadness and destruction into the world.

3) Libertarians value freedom so heavily because we believe in non-aggression; that is, that peaceful action is the only permissible way to treat others. The common good can never be reached through violence or coercion. 

In the freedom to choose right or wrong, good or evil, humanity has a considerable amount of freedom in both big and small. Stoker is right in that the explicit freedom spoken of in Scripture is about freedom from sin and freedom to righteousness. But this far from negates libertarian free will! Throughout the Scriptures we see God imploring humanity to choose the way of life. Israel was beckoned at the beginning of Joshua, “Choose this day whom you will serve.” They were free to reject God’s covenant, free to reject God’s justice, and free to reject God’s blessings for doing it “God’s way.” It is here that we find an inherent integration of our Christianity and our libertarianism. God did not create us puppets on a string, controlling our every move, making us do right. Nor did Jesus implore us to preach the gospel, and—if people reject it—declare ourselves, by proxy through the state, masters of their morality. We are never called to make Jesus Lord of other people’s lives. One of the aspects of Jesus’ Parable of the Sower is that absent the story is the forceful “plowing under” of the seeds, a common and expected practice in his culture. Jesus was saying (in part) God’s Kingdom comes peacefully, not forcefully. We can not force it to happen!

This is where we believe Stoker ultimately misses the mark.  Throughout her series on Christianity and libertarianism, her arguments have hinged upon using force to coerce people to behave a certain way—her way.  She has stated that “Justice in the world actually occurs when people engage with others in a just way,” yet has failed to illustrate how it is just to forcibily take from those who have to give to those who have not.  Coerced charity is not charity at all.  Doing the right thing for the wrong reason is no better than doing the wrong thing for the right reason—it’s just the words that are reversed.

The prophet Micah tells the people of Israel, “He has shown you, O mortal, what is good.  And what does the Lord require of you?  To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God” (Micah 6:8, NIV).  Challenging words, indeed.  But here again we see the same thread we’ve been following through our previous two posts: the freedom to fail, to mess up, to choose wrongly or irresponsibly.

It is nearly impossible to read the narrative of the New Testament without considering the backdrop of the Exodus narrative in the Old Testament. Being released from bondage in Egypt was more than just slavery per se, it was—and still is—imagery that characterized the whole of human existence: bondage to powers that enslave us. Most Christians consider sin that which enslaves all of us. In this sense, the meaning of the Exodus narrative is fully captured in the climactic event of the entire Christian story: resurrection of Jesus. God has freed humanity from the bondage of sin through a new exodus, a new creation. We are thus freed from sin and the effects of sin. The Truth—Jesus—will set us free. We are set free for freedom. Stoker would rightly point out that the biblical writers were probably not thinking of what we call “Enlightenment freedom,” but there is no escaping that the gospel according to Jesus is freedom from all that enslaves, not simply our sinful nature or eternal destination. While this connect far from “proves” libertarianism, it certainly demonstrates compatibility with it.

Stoker concluded her first post with explaining why the state is the best means by which our collectively pooled resources are able to render help to those in need. It’s truly ironic, because where the Bible describes those who need rescue from oppression and slavery, it is from oppressive empires, which is exactly the type of institution which enslaves those whom God cares most about! God heard the cries of God’s people in Egypt, and responded by mocking, shaming,  and ultimately demolishing the Egyptian gods as they knew it. Stoker herself even recognizes the inherent power-over nature of the State, giving further credence to the libertarian claim that power easily corrupts! She cannot have both the State monopolizing the distribution of resources while at the same time chastising the institution of private property as “participation in state power.”

Comments on Stoker’s website have been disabled, but she is reachable on Twitter or via email. Please be kind and respectful if you write to her.

Categories : Articles
Comments (1)
Aug
11

Nuclear Christians

Posted by: | Comments (22)

NagasakibombIn a recent article of mine about Christians apologists for the state, its military, and its wars, I mentioned, for the first time I believe, the term “nuclear Christian.” I would like to elaborate on the meaning of this neologism.

Another anniversary of the dropping by the United States of the atomic bombs “Little Boy” and “Fat Man” on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima (August 6, 1945) and Nagasaki (August 9, 1945)—and the incineration of 200,000 civilians—has come and gone.

Even as more information comes to light and, thanks to the Internet, becomes more readily available about how unnecessary and evil that action was, it seems as though conservative Christians are more resolute in their defense of it.

Not a one of them has probably ever read or even heard of the 1995 book by Gar Alperovitz, The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb and the Architecture of an American Myth, the 2001 article by Ralph Raico, “Hiroshima and Nagasaki,” or the just-published article by Barton J. Bernstein on American conservatives in history who criticized the atomic bombing of Japan.

But it is not just Christians defending the atomic bombs dropped on Japan that is the problem.

Read More→

Categories : Articles
Comments (22)

Who is behind LCC?

Norman Horn is the creator and primary writer for LCC. Learn a little bit about him in the About Page. You can write him a note or ask a question at the Contact Page. Follow him on Twitter.