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Archive for statism

Jul
09

The Cult of Statism

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This guest post is by Rev. Donald Ehrke. He is a Libertarian, a former GOP campaign manager, and ordained minister living in Alexandria, Virginia. Many thanks to Donald for his excellent work! For guest post opportunities, please use the LCC Contact Page.

“You have heard that is was said… But I tell you…” (Matthew 5: 21-22).  When reading the New Testament, it is helpful to recall that Jesus was a transformational teacher – people were astounded by what he said and did.  The Sermon on the Mount is itself a collection of challenges to assumed beliefs – “You have heard…But I tell you…”  An encounter with the Pharisees further demonstrates Jesus’ willingness to confront assumptions.  Seeing Jesus eat with Matthew and his friends the Pharisees asked His disciples, “Why does your teacher eat with tax collectors and sinners?”  Overhearing the question, Jesus responded, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick” (Matthew 9: 11-12). To the modern reader, Jesus’ response is noteworthy but not remarkable.  His answer demonstrates God’s desire to call the lost to salvation; the self-assured and self-righteous have (they believe) little need for mercy.  This insight offers the foundation of Law and Gospel preaching.  Jesus’ words, however, may not be astonishing to today’s Christian because we have grown accustomed to the analogy of Jesus as the “Great Physician.”

In their day, however, the Pharisees would have interpreted Jesus’ words according to Old Testament Law; their education would have alerted them to the meaning of His response. As Old Testament experts the Pharisees would recall Deuteronomy 32: 39, “See now that I, even I, am he, and there is no god beside me; I kill and I make alive; I wound and I heal; and there is none that can deliver out of my hand.”  While in Capernaum, Jesus had cured people, He had forgiven sins, and now He claimed to be the physician who healed.  The Pharisees would have recognized that Jesus was claiming the authority of God.

Christians, naturally, accept God’s authority.  We recognize that He – as Creator – has the right to produce or extinguish life; God may grant or withhold healing according to His will.  Trusting in His divine will, we both offer God our prayers and accept His response.  Jesus remains the Great Physician.

Mankind, nevertheless, often seeks to usurp God’s authority.  The first sin, in fact, was premised on the pledge that eating the forbidden fruit one would make one “like God” (Genesis 3: 5). Mankind’s desire to be God was acted upon again when Cain killed Abel – man demonstrated that he, like God, could end life.  In truth, the Old Testament has many examples of mankind trying to be a god – the Tower of Babel, Nebuchadnezzar’s golden image, the construction of the Golden Calf – are only a few instances of man’s proud attempts to usurp God’s authority.

Today, cults may best represent mankind’s attempt to be a god.  Rather than preaching of freedom from sin and salvation through the atoning sacrifice of Christ, cults teach control.  Cults must control believers to seize godlike authority.  Cult members have exclusive, intimate relationships with one another because, they are told, these are the only people one can trust.  In this manner, members become isolated and dependent upon the cult.  Cult members are commanded to rely on the cult’s leader, even when he or she isn’t personally obeying cult rules.  More, charismatic leaders develop a “cult of personality” and twist God’s word to encourage it.  Leaders brainwash cult members into supposing that the cult is unique and that it possesses a special, elite mission.  The individuality of cult members is crushed, their wealth stolen, and their thoughts controlled all to the glory of the group and its leadership.  Loyalty is not requested, it is demanded.

Christians should be cognizant of any human attempt to steal God’s authority.  We must challenge – as Christ did – those who twist God’s word in order to promote themselves.  We have been warned that these “anti-Christs” would appear in the church (2 Thessalonians 2: 4, 1 John 2: 18) and we should assume that many have emerged.

Likewise, the secular world owns its version of the cult and its presence deserves our attention and challenge.  Statists share the goal of cultists – control.  Statists and cultists create dependency.  Statists and cultists promote “group think” and demonize non-conformists.  Statists and cultists glorify their leaders.  Statists and cultists preach exceptionalism.  Statists and cultists employ intimidation to extract obedience.  The tactics employed by statists and cultists so closely resemble one another that they are often indistinguishable.

Statists also seek to usurp the authority of God by mirroring His attributes.  God is omniscient; the statist supports state surveillance – they must know what we’re reading, writing, or speaking.  God is omnipresent; the statist wants to enter our home to tell us what light bulb to use and into our schools to tell us what to serve for lunch.  God is beneficent; the statist wants all good things to come from the state (healthcare, welfare, jobs, etc.).  God is omnipotent; the statist desires unlimited central authority.  God is sovereign; the statist wishes to commit aggression against his fellow man.  The statist wishes that the state, not God, was our refuge.

Occasionally people will ask whether a Christian can be libertarian.  They may question whether a Christian can place his or her Bible on their library bookshelf next to “Atlas Shrugged” (see The Soul of Atlas for more on that).   Fellow Christians attempt to discern whether free markets and free thinking are inherently incompatible with Christian theology.  

An alternate question is to ask whether a Christian could be anything but libertarian.  This response will be received as conceited and close-minded, so one would not normally apply it.  Nevertheless, freedom and Christianity are undeniably connected.  We are uniquely positioned to understand how limits to Christian freedom and God’s authority to liberate us from sin are threatened by cultist thinking.  Christians know what an “anti-Christ” looks like – we can detect counterfeit saviors.

Our unique position also affords us the opportunity to better detect statist philosophy and activity.  While many citizens unwittingly support statist schemes under the guise of “progressivism” or “conservatism” the libertarian Christian recognizes counterfeit liberty when he or she sees it.

Jesus preached a transformational message that challenged Pharisaical authority.  He challenged – at great risk – the presumptions of mankind.  Libertarian Christians can be encouraged by His example.  Both our churches and communities can be transformed.  Perhaps we can begin by professing that God is God and that God set man free.

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Jul
02

The Religion of Statism

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An image has been making the rounds on Facebook recently suggesting that statism is not much different from a religion.

Strangely enough, the United States federal government (and pretty much every other government in this world) actually claims more power than God generally chooses to wield. The state says it can birth you, clothe you, feed you, educate you, house you, comfort you in psychological stress, protect you, make you well when sick, provide you a job, give you meaning beyond yourself (i.e. nationalism), take care of you in old age, and even bury you. By golly, they sometimes even claim they want to control the weather.

But God, besides his general providential actions, does not even say he will do all of this for you. He actually expects you to do some work. Unless you happen upon a few loaves and fishes at a mountainside sermon seminar, “there ain’t no such thing as a free lunch.” (Salvation excluded, naturally. Thank God we don’t have to work for that!)

Check out the image:

religion-of-statism

Thanks to http://facebook.com/MuhFlag for the image.

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My wife and I joined Manuel Lora of Liberty.me Odds and Ends Podcast and author Lucy Steigerwald for a discussion about our experiences as homeschoolers and how the state messes up education. I thought you might like to hear it.

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This guest post is by Rev. Donald Ehrke. He is a Libertarian, a former GOP campaign manager, and ordained minister living in Alexandria, Virginia. Many thanks to Donald for his excellent work! For guest post opportunities, please use the LCC Contact Page.

“Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God, and whoever loves has been born of God and knows God” (1 John 4: 7).

Love is the essential element of a sanctified Christian existence. Scripture repeatedly exhorts believers to practice a generalized love for mankind as evidence of the faith that the Holy Spirit has created inside of them. It may well be impossible to imagine Christian life absent the affection for one’s fellow man.

Nevertheless, that which is good can – according to our sinful inclinations – be transformed into evil. Love itself does not escape the predatory nature of sinfulness; love can be twisted into sickness. The discussion of love’s occasional conversion from good to evil could be limited to theological dissertations were it not for its cultural and even political consequences.

Christian counselors frequently encounter maladaptive love. In the name of keeping God’s command to love, individuals have frequently learned to love at all cost. People love others despite the horrible treatment they receive in return. Desperate husbands, wives, parents, and children anxiously attempt to cure the ills of those they adore. Their smothering affection creates enabling behaviors, disappointment, destruction, and ultimately unhappiness. In the current lexicon, their love has become “codependent.”

Read More→

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vance_war_empire_militaryThis talk was given at the Authors Forum at the 2014 Austrian Economics Research Conference at the Mises Institute.

I would like to thank Joe Salerno, Mark Thornton, and the Mises Institute for allowing me to talk about my newest book. I would like to talk about how the book came about, its relation to some of my other books, and the book’s content, theme, audience, reception, cover, and emphasis. I look at the book as an antidote to military exceptionalism.

War, Empire, and the Military: Essays on the Follies of War and U.S. Foreign Policy (hereafter just War, Empire, and the Military), cannot be fully understood without reference to the companion volume I published last year, War, Christianity, and the State: Essays on the Follies of Christian Militarism (hereafter just War, Christianity, and the State). But these books cannot be fully understood without reference to the one book that preceded them: Christianity and War and Other Essays Against the Warfare State (hereafter just Christianity and War), the second edition of which was published in 2008 and the first in 2005. This is the book I was encouraged to repudiate and shred when I took delivery from my printer. But even that book cannot be fully understood without reference to a single article titled “Christianity and War” that was published on October 29, 2003, on LewRockwell.com. It was at a conference here at the Mises Institute in 2003 that Lew Rockwell asked me to write something for him on war from an evangelical perspective. And the rest, as they say, is history. Read More→

Categories : Articles, Book Reviews, War
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