Archive for libertarianism

Christians throughout the centuries have always communicated the good news of the Kingdom of God in the vernacular of their surrounding culture. They have engaged those around them by making use of their culture’s shared experiences so that the gospel is heard in a way they will understand. To be effective means to infiltrate and influence society so that God’s will is done on earth as it is in heaven. Those who communicate the gospel effectively are agents of change in the world. One of the challenges for Christians is to avoid letting a culture’s influence dilute the message of the Kingdom of God so as to become ineffective or irrelevant.

The constantly evolving nature of cultures and the inescapable reality of a global pluralist society have become major challenges to the Church in the West, and to Protestantism in particular. The past century has witnessed an unprecedented rate in the change of cultural motifs and the increasing accessibility to these diverse cultures from the foreigner. In centuries past only the wealthy could explore the far regions of the world. Today even the poor can spend a few hours on the Internet to glimpse a foreign cultural experience.

To meet the challenges of a changing global community, a new generation of Christians are diverging from the standard political, social, and theological views they inherited. Although this movement involves the global Christian Church, my experience has been largely within the evangelical community, a relatively recent phenomenon within Christianity’s twenty-century lifespan. Cultural shifts are always a mixed bag, but it is prudent to notice the promise such shifts provide as well as the challenges. Read More→

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When progressives emphasize social justice by using collectivist phrases like “common good” and “caring for our neighbor,” the typical reaction of libertarians is to focus on their wrongheaded policies and methodology. But libertarians who call themselves followers of Jesus can greatly benefit by understanding an important aspect of the gospel. If the good news of Jesus Christ is sufficient for personal transformation, it is sufficient for social transformation as well. But progressives fail to produce workable and ethical social reform, whereas libertarians offer ideas that are not only compatible with social justice efforts, they offer an ethical social framework within which to produce it. Read More→

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Photo by Paciarotta

You do not have to smoke marijuana, inject heroin, or understand The Wire to realize that the War on Drugs is unconstitutional and immoral. Indeed, the drug war is anathema to individual liberty, and the thinking Christian should reject it on every level.

Occasionally, there are even thinking Christians in office like Ron Paul, or my friend in the Texas House Representative David Simpson (keynote speaker at the first Christians for Liberty Conference last August). Yesterday, Rep. Simpson introduced legislation (HB 2165) that will completely decriminalize marijuana and make it the equivalent of “tomatoes, jalapenos, or coffee” in the eyes of the law.

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Feb
24

Sniper Theology

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There came out of the woodwork after George W. Bush’s immoral, unjust, and unnecessary invasion, occupation, and destruction of Iraq certain groups of Christians—many of whom wear cross and flag lapel pins or American flag lapel pins in the shape of a cross.

I have identified them as Christian armchair warriors, Christian Coalition moralists, evangelical warvangelicals, Catholic just war theorists, reich-wing Christian nationalists, theocon Values Voters, imperial Christians, Red-State Christian fascists, bloodthirsty Christian conservatives, nuclear Christians, and God and country Christian bumpkins.

With the advent of the book American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History in 2012 and the movie American Sniper in 2014 — both about Chris Kyle, “deadliest sniper in American history” — there has arisen another class of Christians that many in the previous groups have joined as well: sniper theologians.

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I received an excellent question today from a new reader whom we will call D., and I thought it was so great that it would be worth sharing with you:

Thank you for this website. I have read some of the topics and they are very interesting.

I have just started looking at whether a Christian can be a libertarian. I used to think I was a social conservative, but after watching Senator Rand Paul, I started searching for more information on libertarianism. I found the website libertarianism.com, produced by the Cato Institute.

I reasoned much like them, however, they seem to imply that religion is evil or at least incompatible with reason. Hence my search for more information on libertarianism.

Dr. Horn, what is your religious background? Why doesn’t social conservatism (or conservatism in general) satisfy your biblical and philosophical worldview?

Besides your website, where can I find more information for some one like me who’s just beginning to look for a libertarianism from a biblical point of view?

What is your objective/goal of your organization?

–D.

My response:

Greetings D.,

I’m really glad you emailed me. Thanks for your questions.

My background is in the Churches of Christ (Stone-Campbell tradition, to be clear). It’s a very theologically conservative denomination, but often leans politically conservative as well. I found upon reading economics and political philosophy that I could not reconcile why political conservatism was a good thing. I became increasingly aware of the pathological lying that politicians do, and I realized that conservatism (and, thus, most conservatives) did not actually believe in the things that I knew in my heart were good and right.

Libertarianism was the only logical conclusion. The more I studied, the more I thought that libertarianism was the most consistent expression of Christian political thought. Sure, I still held to most, if not all, the social/moral teachings of the church, but what right did I have to use FORCE against people with whom I disagreed? If a person is not acting in an aggressive manner, I may not raise my hand against them to do harm. Is not my Christian witness the better means of convincing them to change anyway? In this way, we see a convergence of the proper view of Christian tolerance with a libertarian principle of tolerance in the social arena.

Additionally, everywhere I looked in Scripture it was clear that the State was not only NOT the Kingdom of God, but the State was moreover the enemy of God throughout the Bible! Whether you’re looking at the Tower of Babel or Revelation, statism clearly positions itself in opposition to God. You’ll find lots of information about this topic on LibertarianChristians.com, such as my recent talk on the topic.

There are a variety of websites out there that discuss liberty and Christianity, but few that do it as frequently and as thoroughly as LibertarianChristians.com. I would check out the Institute for Faith, Work and Economics and the Acton Institute, although both of those organizations focus more on explaining economic issues than explaining libertarian philosophy. They are good orgs, though, and I highly recommend them. There are also a few other Christian libertarian blogs out there too, such as The Reformed Libertarian and Food For Thinkers, but they do not quite have the same reach as LCC. Of course, you can find articles about Christianity and Liberty at major org websites like FEE.org, Mises.org, Cato.org, the Independent Institute, LewRockwell.com, and many more I imagine. However, they take a more general approach toward libertarianism, whereas LCC is much more specifically targeted for Christians.

It’s funny you would ask about the goals of the organization, because we are going through a major growth phase right now. Last year we hosted the first Christians For Liberty Conference in Austin, Texas and we are hosting another this August. Furthermore, we have begun a new small groups program in which we are connecting Christian libertarians together for fellowship and learning. It’s still very early right now for this, but I hope you’ll join one of our groups when we start one in your area. Of course, our overarching goal is to demonstrate why libertarianism is the natural political philosophy for the Christian, and create more Christian libertarians in the process.

Thanks again for your questions.

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Who is behind LCC?

Norman Horn is the creator and primary writer for LCC. Learn a little bit about him in the About Page. You can write him a note or ask a question at the Contact Page. Follow him on Twitter.
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