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It has been a while since we posted a video from the Christians for Liberty 2014 Conference, but that is primarily because my videographer is… well, let’s just say he has taken a great amount of liberty with the deadlines! :-)  Really, editing is a big job, and I truly appreciate Jason Rink taking the time to do it for us.

Today’s excellent talk comes from Mike Maharrey, Communications Director of the Tenth Amendment Center. Mike takes us through American history and his personal history to suggest why it is important for the Christian to stand up for liberty in the modern age. The stories he tells are exiting and emotionally moving, and you cannot miss his passion for freedom.

Please share on your favorite social network, and get ready for the announcement about our 2015 conference very soon!

Categories : Media
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I received an excellent question today from a new reader whom we will call D., and I thought it was so great that it would be worth sharing with you:

Thank you for this website. I have read some of the topics and they are very interesting.

I have just started looking at whether a Christian can be a libertarian. I used to think I was a social conservative, but after watching Senator Rand Paul, I started searching for more information on libertarianism. I found the website libertarianism.com, produced by the Cato Institute.

I reasoned much like them, however, they seem to imply that religion is evil or at least incompatible with reason. Hence my search for more information on libertarianism.

Dr. Horn, what is your religious background? Why doesn’t social conservatism (or conservatism in general) satisfy your biblical and philosophical worldview?

Besides your website, where can I find more information for some one like me who’s just beginning to look for a libertarianism from a biblical point of view?

What is your objective/goal of your organization?

–D.

My response:

Greetings D.,

I’m really glad you emailed me. Thanks for your questions.

My background is in the Churches of Christ (Stone-Campbell tradition, to be clear). It’s a very theologically conservative denomination, but often leans politically conservative as well. I found upon reading economics and political philosophy that I could not reconcile why political conservatism was a good thing. I became increasingly aware of the pathological lying that politicians do, and I realized that conservatism (and, thus, most conservatives) did not actually believe in the things that I knew in my heart were good and right.

Libertarianism was the only logical conclusion. The more I studied, the more I thought that libertarianism was the most consistent expression of Christian political thought. Sure, I still held to most, if not all, the social/moral teachings of the church, but what right did I have to use FORCE against people with whom I disagreed? If a person is not acting in an aggressive manner, I may not raise my hand against them to do harm. Is not my Christian witness the better means of convincing them to change anyway? In this way, we see a convergence of the proper view of Christian tolerance with a libertarian principle of tolerance in the social arena.

Additionally, everywhere I looked in Scripture it was clear that the State was not only NOT the Kingdom of God, but the State was moreover the enemy of God throughout the Bible! Whether you’re looking at the Tower of Babel or Revelation, statism clearly positions itself in opposition to God. You’ll find lots of information about this topic on LibertarianChristians.com, such as my recent talk on the topic.

There are a variety of websites out there that discuss liberty and Christianity, but few that do it as frequently and as thoroughly as LibertarianChristians.com. I would check out the Institute for Faith, Work and Economics and the Acton Institute, although both of those organizations focus more on explaining economic issues than explaining libertarian philosophy. They are good orgs, though, and I highly recommend them. There are also a few other Christian libertarian blogs out there too, such as The Reformed Libertarian and Food For Thinkers, but they do not quite have the same reach as LCC. Of course, you can find articles about Christianity and Liberty at major org websites like FEE.org, Mises.org, Cato.org, the Independent Institute, LewRockwell.com, and many more I imagine. However, they take a more general approach toward libertarianism, whereas LCC is much more specifically targeted for Christians.

It’s funny you would ask about the goals of the organization, because we are going through a major growth phase right now. Last year we hosted the first Christians For Liberty Conference in Austin, Texas and we are hosting another this August. Furthermore, we have begun a new small groups program in which we are connecting Christian libertarians together for fellowship and learning. It’s still very early right now for this, but I hope you’ll join one of our groups when we start one in your area. Of course, our overarching goal is to demonstrate why libertarianism is the natural political philosophy for the Christian, and create more Christian libertarians in the process.

Thanks again for your questions.

Categories : Articles
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Today, I am very proud to announce our Christians for Liberty small groups program!

Being a Christian libertarian can be really hard sometimes. Rarely will you find a church with lots of people that share those particular views, and online interactions can only go so far for good fellowship. So, LibertarianChristians.com is rolling out a small group program to help connect Christian libertarians all across the USA, and we want you to get involved. We know there are numerous Christian libertarians out there, but we just don’t know where we all are. Our goal is to help connect you with other Christian libertarians in your area so that you can build up yourselves and the community around you with liberty ideas from a Christian perspective.

We have pilot-tested a small group in Austin, Texas for a few months now, and I can tell you truly that it has been a fantastic experience for all involved. It really is surprising what can happen when you bring fellow Christians, many of whom have very different backgrounds, together to talk about our commonality in Christ and our love of liberty.

Look below for our current list of small groups, and join via their social media links. The leaders communicate their events through these channels, so don’t delay and sign up today!

Austin, TX Chapter. Leaders: Jason Rink & Norman Horn
To find out more, join their Facebook Group and Google Group.

Houston, TX Chapter. Leader: Keith Strahan
To find out more, join their Facebook Group and Google Group.

Washington, D.C. Chapter. Leader: Christopher Wolske
To find out more, join their Facebook Group and Google Plus Group.

We also have groups in Pennsylvania, and San Antonio, TX that are almost ready to roll as well. You’ll hear more about them in the near future.

No group in your area? Then let us help you start your own! Contact us here, note that you want to start a small group, and we will get in touch with you shortly.

Finally, the permanent page for the small groups program can be found here, and it will always contain the most up-to-date info about what groups are available.

Categories : Blog News
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This guest post is by Ben Jones. Mr. Jones is a campaign strategist for Equal Justice USA (EJUSA) and works in support of Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty, a project of EJUSA. Even if you disagree with Mr. Jones, you must admit that it is worthwhile to challenge and to evaluate occasionally our deeply-held ideas. Take this opportunity to expand your mind and consider another point of view.

Especially for death penalty proponents, Romans 13:4 has come to occupy a central role in debates on capital punishment. There Paul writes: “[I]f you do what is wrong, you should be afraid for the authority does not bear the sword in vain! It is the servant of God to execute wrath on the wrongdoer.” Notably, Southern Baptists cite Romans 13:4 in their church’s official statement supporting capital punishment. Read More→

Categories : Articles
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I am happy to announce that LibertarianChristians.com will be hosting a breakout session at the International Students for Liberty Conference next weekend. Come meet me, Jason Rink, Doug Stuart, and Chris Wolske as we talk about the challenges Christian libertarians face and propose bold ideas for the future of liberty and the Christian church.

Our session begins on Saturday at 11:15 a.m. (Washington 6 room), and is entitled Christian Libertarian Solutions to Common 21st Century Problems. From the program booklet description:

Christian libertarians face the dual challenge of being Christian in a largely secular libertarian world and of explaining libertarian perspectives in Christian communities. Yet Christian and libertarian beliefs are indeed complimentary and offer solutions to today’s problems. Come learn how to explain this synergy and grow our community.

Besides addressing these “big picture” ideas, we will also be introducing our upcoming program to connect Christian libertarians together through small group meetups. We hope that all Christian students attending will come visit us and learn more about what it means to be a Christian libertarian in the modern world.

This is just the first of many behind the scenes things happening at LCC, so stay tuned as we update you on all the great stuff we have in store for you in 2015!

Categories : Blog News
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Who is behind LCC?

Norman Horn is the creator and primary writer for LCC. Learn a little bit about him in the About Page. You can write him a note or ask a question at the Contact Page. Follow him on Twitter.
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Join our new Small Groups Program!