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Podcast: What Is Moral About Economic Freedom

Libertarian Christians could learn something from our Jewish friends if we would pay attention. I had never heard of Rabbi Daniel Lapin before the Austrian Scholars Conference of 2009, but apparently he is extremely well-known to modern Jews. Rabbi Lapin is the author of dozens of books and audio lecture collections, a few of which I am now the proud owner. He is an engaging speaker and expertly articulates the Old Testament weaved with modern examples.

His talk at the Austrian Scholars Conference was definitely one of the highlights of the weekend (as I said in my blog post that day), and today I am happy to present the recording of his talk as the next LibertarianChristians.com Podcast. The talk is entitled What is Moral About Economic Freedom. Here’s what I live-blogged about it:

“Of principle importance to [Lapin] is the idea that Jews (and I would extend this to Christians) believe implicitly that making money is a good thing. You are de facto doing something good. You don’t have to give it away to validate yourself or your work! Why is this? Because in the relationship that is developed you have provided value to someone else. Lapin’s deep conviction is that by engaging in commerce you are doing something helpful and good for people. You are making them better off. This is firmly rooted in the Judeo-Christian system of ethics!”

Thank you, Rabbi Lapin, for your excellent work. May God bless your efforts.



Right click here to download the entire audio file. [mp3]

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Dr. Norman Horn

Norman founded LibertarianChristians.com and the Libertarian Christian Institute, and currently serves as its President and Editor-in-Chief. He holds a PhD in Chemical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin and a Master of Arts in Theological Studies from the Austin Graduate School of Theology. He currently is a Postdoctoral researcher in Chemical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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